The Love of a Brother;From Plaistow to Passchendaele
 
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The Love of a Brother;

From Plaistow to Passchendaele


 
Fred's story lives on


100 Years

Sunday 13th August 2017 marked one hundred years since Fred fell in action near Ypres (Belgium) whilst serving with The London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) in the battle for Passchendaele.

Fred's home church was St Mary's Plaistow (now at May Road E13 9BQ).
On that day, at their regular Sunday 9.30 a.m. service, the Revd David Hoyte made a number of well worded references to Fred and ensured that one hundred years on Fred was truly            and correctly "REMEMBERED" in his home parish.
 


 

Roll of Honour

As part of the Tower of London Remembers project, from August 2014 there was a nightly sunset ceremony from the poppy-filled Tower moat with the reading of 180 names each evening followed by a bugler playing the Last Post.

A video of this can be seen via

http://hrp.org.uk/toweroflondon

and search for "Roll of Honour - Remembrance"
Fred's name was read on August 24th and comes 10th on the list.

By Armistice Day 2014 there were 888,246 ceramic poppies filling the moat at the Tower of London. Each poppy represented  a British military fatality during WW1.

 "We will remember them"

God Bless Fred.

 

Percy revisits France and Belgium

In 1922 Percy spent a couple of weeks with two other former WW1 dispatch riders returning to places and people that they had known during the war years. Percy wrote a log of their travels. It gives a fascinating historical insight into the devastation still remaining 4 years after the end of the war as well as attitudes of the French and Belgians. And it is written with Percy's familiar wry observations and anecdotes. A copy is with Percy's eldest daughter Audrey and it is now uploaded onto this website.



AT LAST!  A PICTURE OF PERCY ON HIS TRIUMPH DISPATCH  RIDER'S MOTORBIKE.
Taken in March 1919 at Siegburg, Germany



              Percy is front centre


BRONZE MEMORIAL PLAQUE

Fred's Memorial Plaque is with Percy's family. The families of all soldiers who fell in WW1 received a plaque. It is bronze, heavy and about 5 inches diameter. An appropriate acknowledgment and reminder of the sacrfiice made.                                                                                                               

The words are : He died for freedom and honour.  Frederick Ernest Cearns







AN UPDATE ON FRED'S PLAQUE at ST.MARY'S CHURCH, PLAISTOW

In 2011/2012 the present (1981) St. Mary's Church was fully refurbished. A small part of this incorporated the finding of the commemorative plaque for Fred (P 75 of the book) that with others was placed post WW1 in the old St. Mary's Church. These were tracked down to a London Borough of Newham repository. Now the plaque commemorating Fred, as well as one commemorating the Cunnington brothers (P32) are back in St. Mary's and in a special display area focusing on the history of that church.
So Fred's life and sacrifice will continue to be honoured in the area of his family's home and the church that was so much part of their lives.